California Needs to Think Outside the Box on Homelessness

Restricting encampments doesn’t get at the root of the problem.

Sasha Abramsky (https://twitter.com/@AbramskySasha), The Nation

12 de agosto de 2022

An LA Sanitation Bureau crew cleans up a homeless encampment on the sidewalk along Hollywood Boulevard. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

As Western states deal with an unprecedented surge in homelessness, Los Angeles has made the news recently for two actions that approach the crisis from very different angles.

Faced with a growing public outcry against the proliferation of shanty-towns, spilling down one major thoroughfare after the next, the city council voted 11-3 to ban encampments within 500 feet of schools and day care centers.

Mayor Garcetti hasn’t said yet whether he’ll sign the measure, but given public sentiments on the issue—in recent years more than nine in 10 voters in the city have told pollsters that homeless is the most pressing local issue, and the combination of homelessness and fear of crime has had a potent impact on elections in the city this year—it’s hard to see how he could oppose it.

As the council debated the measure, protesters from the homeless community, as well as advocates, rallied noisily outside, calling not just for this policy proposal to be defeated but also for the revocation of other measures banning encampments around railway tracks, loading docks, libraries, and several other designated locales.

This is an issue that divides progressives. On the one hand, there is clearly a public safety and public health issue in play here, not to mention significant quality-of-life issues for local residents and businesses. On the other hand, California has dug itself into a hole around homelessness by failing, year in and year out, to build enough affordable housing, by releasing tens of thousands of prisoners without wraparound social services, and by under-investing for decades in mental health and substance abuse services. Banning the homeless from certain locations doesn’t really address these big-picture issues; it simply shunts the problem down the street a few blocks. It renders the homeless more out-of-sight-out-of-mind without remaking the social compact around housing.

That said, on this issue, I tend to favor a carrot-and-stick approach. Local and state governments must step up to the plate and implement fairer housing and land-use policies; at the same time, I think that cities, along with the general public, are entirely within their rights to want and to expect safe city streets that aren’t open-air bedlams, where people aren’t using streets as bathrooms, and where children don’t have to pass encampments of mentally ill and drug-addicted people on their way to and from school each day. I think Governor Newsom is on the right track in his proposal to create Care Courts that would both oblige counties to provide mental health services to the mentally ill homeless and also impose an obligation to accept those services. I don’t see how rallying in support of encampments—as if public shantytowns were somehow a good in themselves—rather than working to create meaningful policies to tackle homelessness and the on-the-streets mental health crisis is anything other than posture-politics.

LA seems to be stumbling toward this dual-track, carrot-and-stick approach. The same week that the council barred encampments near schools, it also debated a petition, supported by local unions and signed by more than 126,000 voters in the city, requesting that the city pay market rents to hotels to house homeless people in their vacant rooms, and that it mandate new hotel developments to replace affordable housing lost as a result of the new tourist-oriented land use. After a short debate, the council agreed to put the proposal to LA’s voters.

Over the coming months, hotel owners will undoubtedly put up a furious opposition—after all, housing the homeless next to paying hotel guests probably won’t be great for business, and hoteliers are right that they aren’t, and shouldn’t be expected to be, frontline social service agencies. It’s certainly not a given that the proposal will ultimately pass, once voters ponder its full implications. But pass or fail, at the very least it shows that the council is ready to start contemplating outside-the-box solutions to what has become a shameful humanitarian catastrophe on the streets of LA and other West Coast cities.

On the subject of hotels, earlier this summer the Los Angeles City Council approved the Workplace Security, Workload, Wage and Retention Measures for Hotel Workers ordinance. It kicked in on Monday, August 8, and contains a number of important provisions that ought to be emulated in other industries and other locales: It makes overtime work voluntary in hotels; mandates employers to keep detailed records on what work employees were required to do, in case employees choose to file suit on their labor conditions; requires that employers pay clearers double-time if they have to clean more than a designated number of square feet per day; and orders hotels to provide room staff with personal alarms, in case they are attacked by guests.

With this measure, Los Angeles has now joined a host of other Southern Californian cities that, at the urgings of service unions, have implemented stringent workplace protections for hotel staff.

There’s a lot that’s wrong with California, and a lot left to be desired of California’s political leaders, at the city, county, and state level. Yet at least these days they’re making a bona fide effort to tackle workplace safety issues, the housing crisis, and other major societal problems. This week, to take another example, the governor’s office announced the creation of the country’s largest college savings plan, which will give low-income children in the state up to $1,500 to seed their savings for college.

When California thinks big, as it is doing at the moment, it has the gravitational field to pull much of the country into its orbit. On a range of issues, the state is now moving toward social democratic priorities. That can only be a good thing for America as a whole.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de The Nation

Abramsky, S. (2022). California Needs to Think Outside the Box on Homelessness. The Nation. Recuperado el 12 de agosto de 2022, de https://www.thenation.com/article/society/los-angeles-homelessness/

Actualización de Casos de COVID-19 en el Sur de California

25 de marzo de 2021

Esta puede ser una herramienta para los residentes del sur de California, particularmente los mexicanos de habla hispana que actualmente trabajan a tasas más altas, pueden navegar para evitar el coronavirus a nivel geográfico.

Es probable que estos datos ayuden a determinar qué área se ve más afectada en relación con su viaje diario o sus actividades recreativas.

Estadísticas por condado
CondadosCasosMuertesÚltima actualización
Los Angeles1,215,73622,96003/25/2021
Orange243,6653,68502/19/2021
Riverside289,7733,79203/01/2021
San Bernardino278,8022,14102/09/2021
Ventura73,61868302/09/2021
San Diego253,6413,04202/16/2021
Santa Barbara30,20634802/09/2021
Imperial24,71963303/01/2021
Total de casos: 2,410,160Total de muertes: 37,284
Datos recuperados el 25 de marzo de 2021, de http://www.chicano.press:5000/

El mapa completo e interactivo que muestra la localización de casos se puede consultar en: http://chicano.press:5000/

Indígenas en Los Ángeles luchan por preservar su vida y su cultura mientras la pandemia arrasa sus comunidades

Democracy Now! | Desinformémonos.

Viernes 5 de marzo de 2021

El condado de Los Ángeles está registrando un récord de contagios y muertes por COVID-19, y sus hospitales están desbordados. Las comunidades indígenas de la región se encuentran entre los sectores más afectados en vecindarios de clase trabajadora, donde gran parte de la población trabaja en tareas esenciales.

“La población indígena no tenemos el privilegio de quedarnos en casa y no ir a trabajar”, dice Odilia Romero, cofundadora y directora ejecutiva de Comunidades Indígenas en Liderazgo (CIELO), una organización sin fines de lucro liderada por mujeres indígenas que trabaja con comunidades de Los Ángeles.

Romero también lamenta “la pérdida de conocimientos” generada por la devastación de la COVID-19: “Algunos de nuestros mayores han fallecido y con ellos se va toda su cosmovisión”. Recientemente, CIELO publicó un libro que documenta historias de vida en medio de la pandemia de mujeres indígenas indocumentadas de México y Guatemala que residen en Los Ángeles.

Mira el videoreportaje completo aquí

Transcripción del videoreportaje:

AMY GOODMAN: Esto es Democracy Now! Soy Amy Goodman, con Juan González. Cuatro mil trescientos veintisiete. Ese es el número récord de muertes por coronavirus registradas en un solo día en EE.UU., un récord también a nivel mundial. Es un número mayor que el total de personas que han muerto de COVID-19 en Corea del Sur durante toda la pandemia. Más que el número total de personas que han muerto de COVID-19 en Japón, reitero, a lo largo de toda la pandemia.

En medio de estas nuevas cifras récord que una vez más enfrenta EE.UU., pasamos a hablar sobre California. Se calcula que el condado de Los Ángeles, el área más afectada de ese estado, alcanzará la cifra de un millón de contagios por COVID-19 a mediados de enero, mientras se registran cifras récord de muertes y los hospitales siguen desbordados. Durante la primera semana de enero, se reportaron 1.600 muertes en Los Ángeles, lo que equivale a un promedio de una muerte cada seis minutos. Este momento crítico para Los Ángeles llega en medio de las elevadas cifras en todo el estado. El lunes 11 de enero, el gobernador Gavin Newsom dijo que el estado de California abriría centros de vacunación masiva. GOV.

GAVIN NEWSOM: Reconocemos que la estrategia actual no nos va a acercar a nuestro objetivo tan rápido como todos lo necesitamos, y por eso vamos a agilizar la administración de las vacunas, no solo para grupos prioritarios, sino también abriendo grandes centros para vacunar a más personas. Los estadios de los Dodgers y de los Padres y el centro de convenciones Cal Expo, entre otros, se convertirán en grandes centros de vacunación y empezarán a funcionar esta misma semana.

AMY GOODMAN: El virus ha afectado en mayor gravedad a las comunidades latinas e indígenas de Los Ángeles, ya que la COVID-19 se ha propagado en barrios de clase trabajadora, donde muchos son trabajadores esenciales. Este es el Dr. Edgar Chavez, quien trabaja en una clínica comunitaria en Los Ángeles, hablando para la cadena NBC.

EDGAR CHAVEZ: No es fácil para nosotros ver a nuestra población haciendo los trabajos que nadie más quiere hacer, poniendo la cara, exponiéndose a la COVID, para luego morir a causa de esta, sin recibir la atención médica adecuada, sin recibir la vacuna a tiempo.

AMY GOODMAN: En Los Ángeles, las comunidades indígenas provenientes de México y Centroamérica se han visto particularmente afectadas al tener que hacer frente tanto a la COVID-19 como a las barreras adicionales del idioma y a la falta de acceso a la información y la atención médica necesarias.

Para ampliar este tema nos acompaña desde Los Ángeles Odilia Romero, cofundadora y directora ejecutiva de Comunidades Indígenas en Liderazgo (CIELO), una organización sin fines de lucro liderada por mujeres indígenas que ha recaudado más de un millón de dólares para proveer ayuda por la pandemia a las comunidades indígenas de Los Ángeles. Recientemente, CIELO publicó un libro, cuyo nombre le voy a pedir que pronuncie, que documenta historias de vida de mujeres indígenas indocumentadas de México y Guatemala durante la pandemia. Odilia Romero es intérprete zapoteca y ha ocupado puestos de liderazgo en el Frente Indígena de Organizaciones Binacionales durante 25 años.

Odilia, bienvenida de nuevo a Democracy Now! Para empezar, ¿podría por favor decirnos el nombre de su libro, para no pronunciarlo incorrectamente? Y luego háblenos sobre las comunidades indígenas inmigrantes y sobre su situación en medio de esta pandemia sin precedentes.

ODILIA ROMERO: Buenos días, Amy. Gracias por invitarme de nuevo. Pa diuxi. El nombre del libro es “Diža ’No’ole”, que significa “palabra de mujer”.

La COVID-19 ha sido devastadora para las comunidades indígenas del condado de Los Ángeles. Cada vez que hablo con alguien de la comunidad, me comentan sobre la muerte del mecánico, del sanador, del danzante. Y eso sucede cada día que tenemos la oportunidad de hablar con la gente, es una tragedia. Ayer hablé con alguien que me dijo: “Han muerto ocho personas esta semana en mi comunidad”. Otra mujer me dijo: “Cuatro personas han muerto en mi comunidad”. Así que cada días que hablo con alguien de la comunidad hay más y más muertos.

Y esto sucede porque la población indígena no tenemos el privilegio de quedarnos en casa y no ir a trabajar. Tenemos que ir a trabajar. Hemos escuchado muchas historias a través de nuestro fondo “Undocu-Indigenous Fund”: “No tengo dinero para pagar el alquiler. Los fondos que recibo gracias a la organización CIELO van directamente a pagar mi alquiler. No tengo comida. Tengo que trabajar. Vendo comida en la calle”. Esto crea una situación en que las personas se exponen a contraer la COVID-19. Y cuando la gente se contagia… Mucha gente ha perdido sus apartamentos y ahora está viviendo con otras familias. Así que si una persona se contagia, infecta al resto.

Ha sido realmente doloroso ver el impacto de la COVID en las comunidades indígenas. La tasa de contagios es muy alta. Y cuando vas al hospital, incluso si uno habla español o inglés, estás solo allí, pero si es [una persona indígena] no hay nadie que interprete en su idioma. Y cuando comenzó esta pandemia, cuando comenzamos los fondos, decíamos: “Conozco a alguien que conoce a una persona que tuvo COVID”. Luego, durante el verano: “Una persona en mi familia tuvo COVID”. Ahora, cuando hablas con la gente lo que te dicen es: “Tengo COVID”. Un familiar: “Tengo COVID”. Mi mamá: “Tengo COVID”. Mi madre ha estado ingresada en el hospital. Estuvo allí durante 10 días. Y fue devastador saber que estaba ahí y no poder verla, no poder hablar con ella, y que ella tampoco pudiera comunicarse en su idioma indígena. Ella entró en una profunda depresión y por un momento pensamos que la íbamos a perder. Todo esto es lo que está sucediendo con las comunidades indígenas: falta de fondos y una gran inseguridad alimentaria. Así que estamos sufriendo mucho actualmente, Amy.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Odilia, hemos escuchado muchas historias indignantes en los últimos días sobre la forma desigual en que se está manejando la pandemia. Estoy pensando específicamente en los jugadores de la Liga Nacional de Fútbol Americano, la NFL, que todos los días se realizan pruebas de diagnóstico de la COVID-19 solo para asegurarse de que los partidos puedan continuar. También sabemos que hay instituciones médicas de élite, como el Hospital Presbiteriano de Nueva York y el Hospital Brighman, que están vacunando, no solo al personal de emergencias que de verdad son quienes atienden a los pacientes con COVID, sino a sus estudiantes de posgrado, a sus administradores y a todo tipo de personas que en realidad no están en riesgo. Mientras tanto, ustedes se enfrentan a esta crisis en Los Ángeles. ¿Cuál es su reacción al escuchar algunas de estas historias?

ODILIA ROMERO: Mi reacción y la de nuestro equipo es la siguiente: es muy desgarrador escuchar las historias de nuestra comunidad. Hay veces en que nos reunimos con nuestro equipo por la noche, porque estamos haciendo la cuarentena juntos, y nos sentamos sin saber qué hacer. Estamos atados de manos. Solo hemos recaudado 3,4 millones de dólares, que parece mucho dinero, pero solo sirve para ayudar a 5.000 personas. Cuando la gente llama diciendo: “¿Tienen comida para mí? ¿Me podrían ayudar con algo de dinero para el alquiler?, porque el dueño de la vivienda me está amenazando”. Cuando escuchamos cosas como: “Tengo que ir a trabajar, pero estoy contagiado”. Cuando hablamos con la gente y están tosiendo, y luego nos damos cuenta del privilegio del que otros disfrutan mientras los trabajadores esenciales no pueden acceder a la vacuna, es descorazonador.

Y personalmente es muy frustrante. No tengo palabras para describir la rabia que a veces siento al ver a las comunidades indígenas en la primera línea contra la pandemia. En los campos agrícolas, en la industria hotelera, en las tintorerías, estamos ahí. Y no tenemos acceso a la vacuna. No tenemos acceso a más fondos de los que tenemos en CIELO. Y lo que tenemos en CIELO puede parecer mucho dinero, pero en realidad no es nada comparado con las necesidades de la gente en este momento.

Y además de todo esto, tenemos que hablar de las personas que no pueden trabajar porque tienen hijos y deben quedarse en casa. Un día un padre de familia me dijo: “En nuestra casas viven cuatro familias, y los niños piden pizza, así que nos turnamos. Una familia compra una pizza y damos prioridad a los niños”. Algunas familias han mencionado que están reduciendo su consumo de alimentos para dar prioridad a los niños. Es muy desgarrador y deprimente.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Odilia, ¿podría también hablar sobre qué medidas ha tomado el gobernador Newsom a nivel estatal para ayudar a algunas de las comunidades más afectadas, especialmente en lugares como Los Ángeles? Allí un buena parte de sus residentes son indocumentados y no pueden acceder a las ayudas del Gobierno federal.

ODILIA ROMERO: Bueno, se ha visto bastante apoyo para las comunidades indocumentadas. Se creó un fondo de ayuda en California. Pero, en cuanto a la población indígena en particular, no se ha visto un esfuerzo similar. Nos etiquetan como personas de origen latino y con eso dan por hecho que están dando asistencia a los latinos indocumentados. Pero no somos latinos.

Una de las cosas a considerar en cuanto al acceso a estos recursos por parte de la población indígena, es la barrera del idioma. Muchas personas indígenas no han recibido educación universitaria, así que no saben leer ni escribir y eso les impide acceder a muchos fondos. Varios miembros de la comunidad nos han hecho saber que han enviado solicitudes. Unas de las cosas hermosas que han salido de todo esto es que [en nuestra organización] podemos hablar su idioma. Tenemos personal que habla k’iche’, zapoteca, mixteca, y eso nos permite comunicarnos con la comunidad. Eso marca una gran diferencia durante el proceso para pedir fondos. [Aparte de eso], ha habido poco esfuerzo para ayudar a las comunidades indígenas.

AMY GOODMAN: Quisiera continuar con ese asunto sobre quiénes están muriendo, las vidas y el conocimiento que se ha perdido. Mientras usted hablaba recordé una conversación que tuve con un miembro del pueblo Sioux de Standing Rock. Allí han priorizado a los hablantes de los idiomas nativos para la distribución de las vacunas contra la COVID-19, porque hay culturas e idiomas que se están extinguiendo con la muerte de sus mayores durante la pandemia. Odilia, ¿podría hablarnos sobre lo que está pasando en Los Ángeles, ya que usted es intérprete zapoteca, con el pueblo zapoteco, con los k’iche’? Háblenos sobre lo que no muestran los datos. Usted describe eso como una forma de borrar a los pueblos indígenas.

ODILIA ROMERO: Anoche, por ejemplo, el Departamento de Salud del condado publicó lo siguiente: Nuevas muertes hasta el momento, 288. Yo sé que al menos 15 de esas personas eran indígenas, porque nuestro equipo o yo misma hemos hablado con sus familiares. En cuanto a los nuevos casos, se han registrado 11.844. También sé que de esos, unos cien se dieron en comunidades indígenas.

Y uno podría decir que esos números son bajos. Pero, precisamente por ser una población pequeña, la perdida de vidas, los contagios y la perdida de conocimientos se sienten de verdad. Algunos de nuestros mayores han fallecido y con ellos se va toda su cosmovisión. Justo la semana pasada murió alguien de la comunidad que conocía muchas historias de migraciones. Fue una de las primeras mujeres de su pueblo que vino a EE.UU. y ayudo a venir a muchas otras mujeres. Todas sus historias han desaparecido.

Y con la COVID, el idioma está muriendo más rápido que nunca, especialmente aquí en Los Ángeles, con los mayores indígenas. Yo hablo el idioma, pero esa fue una de las cosas que pensé cuando mi mamá estuvo en el hospital: Nunca documentamos su historia. ¿Que pasará con todas las recetas de comida que tiene mi mamá? Todo su conocimiento. Esa es una de esas cosas que para nosotros es importante.

Sería genial si las comunidades indígenas tuvieran acceso a la vacuna, porque hay mucha sabiduría que desaparecerá con la COVID. Y debido a que vivimos en lugares confinados aquí en Los Ángeles, el riesgo de nuestros mayores a resultar contagiados y morir es mucho mayor que en cualquier otro lugar, así como el riesgo de que desaparezcan el idioma y las tradiciones. Cuando uno de los sanadores tradicionales estuvo hospitalizado, yo llamé, pero no habla ni español ni inglés, [habla una variante de zapoteco que no interpretamos]. ¿Cómo iba a comunicarme con él? Fue imposible. Afortunadamente, ya está en casa y se encuentra mejor. Pero estas son las cosas que son desgarradoras para nosotros aquí en CIELO.

AMY GOODMAN: Muchísimas gracias por acompañarnos, Odilia Romero, intérprete zapoteca y directora ejecutiva de Comunidades Indígenas en Liderazgo (CIELO), que ayudó a recaudar más de un millón de dólares para ayudar a las comunidades indígenas de Los Ángeles. Romero ha publicado un libro que documenta las historias de vida y muerte de esas comunidades durante la pandemia.

Con esto concluimos nuestra emisión. La Cámara de Representantes va a votar para someter a Trump a un nuevo juicio político, el primer presidente en ser enjuiciado dos veces. Transmitiremos el debate y la votación en democracynow.org, a partir de las 9 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU.

Esto es todo por hoy. Democracy Now! es producido por Renée Feltz, Mike Burke, Deena Guzder, Libby Rainey, Nermeen Shaikh, María Taracena, Carla Wills, Tami Woronoff, Charina Nadura, Sam Alcoff, Tey-Marie Astudillo, John Hamilton, Robby Karran, Hany Massoud y Adriano Contreras. Nuestra directora general es Julie Crosby. Un agradecimiento especial a Becca Staley, Miriam Barnard, Mike DiFilippo, Miguel Nogueira, Hugh Gran, Denis Moynihan, David Prude y Dennis McCormick.

Recuerden, usar tapabocas es un acto de amor. Soy Amy Goodman, con Juan González. Gracias por acompañarnos.


Traducido por Iván Hincapié. Editado por Igor Moreno Unanua.

Publicado originalmente en Democracy Now!

Democracy Now (2021). Indígenas en Los Ángeles luchan por preservar su vida y su cultura mientras la pandemia arrasa sus comunidades. Desinformémonos. Recuperado el 5 de marzo de 2021 de: https://desinformemonos.org/indigenas-en-los-angeles-luchan-por-preservar-su-vida-y-su-cultura-mientras-la-pandemia-arrasa-sus-comunidades/

Actualización de Casos de COVID-19 en el Sur de California

04 de marzo de 2021

Captura tomada el 04 de marzo de 2021, de http://chicano.press:5000/

Esta puede ser una herramienta para los residentes del sur de California, particularmente los mexicanos de habla hispana que actualmente trabajan a tasas más altas, pueden navegar para evitar el coronavirus a nivel geográfico.

Es probable que estos datos ayuden a determinar qué área se ve más afectada en relación con su viaje diario o sus actividades recreativas.

Estadísticas por
Estadísticas por condado
CondadosCasosMuertesÚltima actualización
Los Angeles1,195,91321,66903/03/2021
Orange243,6653,68502/19/2021
Riverside289,7733,79203/01/2021
San Bernardino278,8022,14102/09/2021
Ventura73,61868302/09/2021
San Diego253,6413,04202/16/2021
Santa Barbara30,20634802/09/2021
Imperial24,71963303/01/2021
Total de casos: 2,390,337Total de muertes: 35,993
Datos recuperados el 04 de marzo de 2021, de http://chicano.press:5000/

El mapa completo e interactivo que muestra la localización de casos se puede consultar en: http://chicano.press:5000/

Actualización de Casos de COVID-19 en el Sur de California

25 de febrero de 2021

Captura tomada el 25 de febrero de 2021, de http://chicano.press:5000/

Esta puede ser una herramienta para los residentes del sur de California, particularmente los mexicanos de habla hispana que actualmente trabajan a tasas más altas, pueden navegar para evitar el coronavirus a nivel geográfico.

Es probable que estos datos ayuden a determinar qué área se ve más afectada en relación con su viaje diario o sus actividades recreativas.

Estadísticas por condado
CondadosCasosMuertesÚltima actualización
Los Angeles1,185,45720,98702/24/2021
Orange243,6653,68502/19/2021
Riverside2,428,9463,66402/23/2021
San Bernardino278,8022,14102/09/2021
Ventura73,61868302/09/2021
San Diego253,6413,04202/16/2021
Santa Barbara30,20634802/09/2021
Imperial26,77958402/16/2021
Total de casos: 4,521,114Total de muertes: 35,134
Datos recuperados el 25 de febrero de 2021, de http://chicano.press:5000/

El mapa completo e interactivo que muestra la localización de casos se puede consultar en: http://chicano.press:5000/