California CARE Court bill heads to Newsom

Madison Hirneisein, The Center Square

31 de agosto de 2022

A man stands next to tents on a sidewalk in San Francisco, Tuesday, April 21, 2020.Jeff Chiu / AP

(The Center Square) – California lawmakers gave the final stamp of approval Wednesday to a bill backed by Gov. Gavin Newsom that provides court-ordered treatment plans and supportive services for people on the schizophrenia spectrum or with psychotic disorders.

The bill, which establishes the Community Assistance, Recovery and Empowerment (CARE) Act, received broad bipartisan support in both chambers of the Legislature, passing in a 62-2 vote in the Assembly and unanimously in the Senate. The bill now heads to Newsom’s desk.

“Today’s passage of the CARE Act means hope for thousands of Californians suffering from severe forms of mental illness who too often languish on our streets without the treatment they desperately need and deserve,” Newsom said in a statement Wednesday.

Backed by cities across the state and strongly opposed by disability rights advocates and the American Civil Liberties Union, the bill would let a person petition for a court-ordered plan that could include behavioral health care, medication, and housing. The petition triggers hearings to develop a treatment plan.

Adults experiencing a severe mental illness like schizophrenia and are either “unlikely to survive safely” without supervision or have a condition that requires support to prevent deterioration could qualify for the program. The CARE plan could last for up to two years, providing services like medication and treatment.

Newsom and others have touted the measure as a way to break the cycle of homelessness and incarceration among people with severe mental problems.

The measure has faced strong opposition from groups within California and across the nation who fear it will result in coerced treatment that would take away a person’s right to make their own care decisions.

Eric Harris, the director of Public Policy with Disability Rights California, told The Center Square Wednesday that the organization still has major concerns about the bill and is “disappointed” in its passage on Wednesday. 

“Forced treatment and not providing guaranteed housing is not going to be beneficial to a lot of these people,” Harris said. “We believe that voluntary treatment options that are robust and guarantee accessible, affordable housing is going to bring out the best results and have people who want to engage in this type of process.”

Harris said the bill was constructed without input from a “large number of disability leaders,” noting that leaders at Disability Rights California “weren’t consulted at all.”

The bill received several amendments in its final days in the Legislature, including one that phases in implementation. The counties of Glenn, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Stanislaus, Tuolumne and the city and county of San Francisco must implement the program by Oct. 1, 2023. The rest of the state has until Dec. 1, 2024.

Other amendments require funding from the Department of Health Care Services and substitute the director of county behavioral health as the petitioner if someone other than the director petitions the court.

As the bill wound its way through the Legislature, lawmakers raised concerns about how the program would be funded and whether counties would have the staffing to handle the program. In the end, the bill won praise from both Democratic and Republican lawmakers for its potential to curb addiction and homelessness.

“This measure, I believe, is the first truly bipartisan attempt to compassionately clear homeless encampments off our streets, sidewalks and highways, to assess the health behavior and needs of homeless individuals and to put together an actual plan to stop the downward spiral that many homeless individuals have so long been on,” Senator Brian Jones, R-Santee, said Wednesday. 

Two lawmakers voted against the measure – Assemblymember Ash Kalra and Mark Stone. In a statement sent to The Center Square, Kalra said he could not support the bill because the program has “missing pieces needed for an effective, sustainable solution.”

“While I echo the urgency to find a solution, if we do not couple permanent housing and wraparound services for our unhoused with severe mental illness, we are setting them up for failure,” Kalra said. 

Newsom has until Sept. 30 to sign the legislation.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de The Center Square

Hirneisen, M. (2022). California CARE Court bill heads to Newsom. The Center Square. Recuperado el 01 de septiembre de 2022, de https://www.thecentersquare.com/california/california-care-court-bill-heads-to-newsom/article_f6f2586e-298c-11ed-bacd-338ce7bcf81f.html

CA governor’s mental health care plan for homeless advances

JANIE HAR and ADAM BEAM, AP NEWS

31 de agosto de 2022

FILE – Tents line the streets of the Skid Row area of Los Angeles Friday, July 22, 2022. California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal to steer homeless people with severe mental disorders into treatment was approved by the state Assembly on Tuesday, Aug. 30. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s controversial proposal to steer homeless people with severe mental disorders into treatment cleared the state Assembly on Tuesday and is on its way to becoming law despite objections from civil liberties advocates who fear it will be used to force unhoused residents into care they don’t want.

Homeless people with severe mental health disorders often cycle among the streets, jail and hospitals, with no one entity responsible for their well-being. They can be held against their will at a psychiatric hospital for up to 72 hours. But once stabilized, a person who agrees to continue taking medication and follow up on services must be released.

The bill the state Assembly approved on Tuesday by a 60-2 vote would require counties to set up a special civil court to process petitions brought by family, first responders and others on behalf of an individual diagnosed with specified disorders, such as schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

The court could order a plan lasting up to 12 months, and renewable for another 12 months. An individual facing a criminal charge could avoid punishment by completing a mental health treatment plan. A person who does not agree to a treatment plan could be compelled into it. Newsom has said he hopes these courts catch people before they fall into the criminal court system.

The bill represents a new approach for California to address homelessness, a crisis the state has struggled with for decades. The state government spends billions of dollars on the issue each year, only for the public to perceive little progress on the streets.

“I believe that this bill is an opportunity for us to write a new narrative,” said Assemblymember Mike Gipson, a Democrat who voted for the bill.

The bill has now passed both houses of the state Legislature and needs one more vote in the state Senate before it will go to Newsom’s desk. Newsom has until the end of September to sign it into law.

The proposal had broad support from lawmakers who said it was clear California had to do something about the mental health crisis visible along highways and in city streets. Supporters relayed harrowing tales of watching loved ones cycle in and out of temporary psychiatric holds, without a mechanism to stabilize them in a long-term treatment plan.

Republican Assemblymember Suzette Martinez Valladares said her cousin, a Vietnam War veteran, had been living on the streets in a homeless camp before his death.

“I wish that my family had the tools that this bill is going to bring forward so that he might still be alive and with us,” she said. “This is going to save lives. It’s about time.”

Critics of the legislation have maintained that the state lacks enough homes, treatment beds, outreach workers and therapists to care for those who want help, never mind people compelled to take it. They say that people who choose to accept treatment are much more likely to succeed than those coerced into it.

“At what point does compassion end and our desire to just get people off the streets and out of our public sight begins?” said Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi, a Democrat who said he reluctantly supported the bill on Tuesday. “I don’t think this is a great bill. But it seems to be the best idea that we have at this point to try to improve a godawful situation.”

The bill says Glenn, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, San Francisco, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne counties must establish courts by Oct. 1, 2023, with the remainder by Dec. 1, 2024.

Courts could fine counties up to $1,000 a day for non-compliance, which counties believe is unfair if they don’t have enough support from the state in the way of housing and behavioral health workers.

“There will be no perfect solution to this problem. But this is better than doing nothing and it is too easy in a democracy to kick a problem down the road and do nothing,” said Assemblymember Steve Bennett, a Democrat who voted for the bill.

___

Har reported from San Francisco.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de AP NEWS

Har, J. & Beam, A. (2022). CA governor’s mental health care plan for homeless advances. AP NEWS. Recuperado el 31 de agosto de 2022, de https://apnews.com/article/health-california-gavin-newsom-mental-government-and-politics-c52069d7e48de92adf09b783b36bbaee

Government squabbling cripples plans for the homeless

Dan Walters, CalMatters Commentary

14 de agosto de 2022

California, the nation’s wealthiest state, also has the nation’s most severe homelessness crisis.

The most recent official count of Californians lacking permanent shelter is 161,000 — more than a quarter of the nation’s homeless population — but it’s widely assumed that the real number is much higher.

As the crisis has worsened, federal, state and local government officials have committed tens of billions of dollars to alleviating its effects. The recently enacted 2022-23 state budget alone would spend $10.2 billion over two years.

However, the heavy spending has so far had little noticeable impact. The money has been spent on a plethora of ideas to get homeless people off the street and deal with their underlying issues, but there has been little coordination, much less anything like a comprehensive plan, as a 2021 report from the state auditor’s office pointed out.

“With more than 151,000 Californians who experienced homelessness in 2019, the state has the largest homeless population in the nation, but its approach to addressing homelessness is disjointed,” the sharply worded report said. “At least nine state agencies administer and oversee 41 different programs that provide funding to mitigate homelessness, yet no single entity oversees the state’s efforts or is responsible for developing a statewide strategic plan.”

The lack of intergovernmental cooperation and coordination has many root causes, and one of them is the difference between cities and counties. Overwhelmingly, the visible effects of homelessness — such as squalid sidewalk encampments — are concentrated in cities, particularly the most populous ones, but county governments are responsible for administering social services.

A case in point is the squabbling now underway in Sacramento over how to deal with its homelessness crisis, centered on downtown streets surrounding the state Capitol.

Darrell Steinberg, a former president pro tem of the state Senate, was elected Sacramento’s mayor on a promise to deal with homelessness, but after several years of wheelspinning, was confronted with a ballot measure proposed by local business interests that would compel the city to act.

It would have required the city to authorize emergency shelter space for 75% of Sacramento’s unsheltered people within 60 days of voter passage. City officials hurriedly drafted a softer alternative, requiring shelter for 60% of homeless residents and 20% of them within 90 days of voter approval. Sponsors of the original measure agreed to put it on the shelf.

Last week, however, the city council more or less reneged on the deal. Just days before the deadline for placing measures on the November ballot, the city council made a major amendment that would block implementation unless county officials agreed to provide mental health and other services at the proposed shelter sites.

City officials had hoped that the county would emulate their measure with one of their own, but county officials balked and, instead, enacted a tough ordinance to ban homeless camps in the American River Parkway, which runs through the city. Such a law, city officials fear, could push more homeless people onto city streets.

The city’s amendment angered proponents of the original ballot measure, who said it unilaterally undid their agreement with the city.

Jeffrey Dorso, senior vice president for the Sacramento Kings, whose downtown arena is ringed with homeless camps, told council members, “I don’t know if any other ballot proponent ever going forward in the future will be ever willing to negotiate on a ballot initiative.”

The intergovernmental discord in Sacramento is a microcosm of a statewide syndrome and unless it changes, we’ll continue to pump billions of dollars down a rathole of failure.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de CalMatters

Walters, D. (2022). Government squabbling cripples plans for the homeless. CalMatters. Recuperado el 15 de agosto de 2022, de https://calmatters.org/commentary/2022/08/government-squabbling-cripples-plans-for-the-homeless/

Políticas del gobierno controlan, explotan y mercantilizan a los pueblos indígenas: Frayba

Redacción Desinformémonos

09 de agosto de 2022

Ciudad de México | Desinformémonos. «Las políticas actuales del gobierno mexicano siguen su ruta hacia el control, explotación y mercantilización de los bienes naturales en territorios de los pueblos indígenas de México», aseguró el Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de las Casas (Frayba) en el marco del Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas.

En un comunicado, el Frayba recordó que el Estado mexicano «tiene una deuda histórica con los pueblos originarios» y sigue sin reconocer plenamente sus derechos colectivos, «en medio de un racismo y discriminación estructural que activa diversas violencias en su contra».

Ejemplificó con que el gobierno, a través de la imposición de proyectos como el Tren Maya, el Corredor Transístmico o el Proyecto Integral Morelos (PIM), viola el derecho a la consulta previa, libre e informada, así como busca generar una política de asimilación e integración de los pueblos «a través de un nuevo indigenismo que tiene como elemento central el exterminio y sus pilares son la explotación, despojo, desprecio y represión».

Por otro lado, celebró los aportes de los procesos que se han construido desde los pueblos a partir de los Acuerdos de San Andrés junto al ejercicio pleno de la autonomía, autodeterminación y resistencia, como los son desde el 9 de agosto de 2003 el nacimiento de los Caracoles Zapatistas y las Juntas de Buen Gobierno.

Estas formas de organización autónoma del Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN), explicó el Frayba, «impulsan el ejercicio de los derechos colectivos desde la organización de abajo, de los pueblos que avanzan en la liberación de la dependencia y control gubernamental».

A continuación el comunicado completo:

En el marco del Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas, el Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas (Frayba) sostiene que el Estado mexicano tiene una deuda histórica con los pueblos originarios, sigue sin reconocer plenamente sus derechos colectivos, en medio de un racismo y discriminación estructural que activa diversas violencias en su contra.

Las políticas actuales del gobierno mexicano siguen su ruta hacia el control, explotación y mercantilización de los bienes naturales en territorios de los Pueblos Indígenas de México. Se niega la diversidad de sistemas de vida que tienen raíces profundas desde la cultura ancestral. Además, por la riqueza que presentan los territorios en que habitan, sufren cotidianamente una práctica de control poblacional con el fin de despojarlos de sus tierras y medios de vida. El gobierno actual a través de imposición busca el “desarrollo”, violando el derecho a la consulta previa, libre e informada como sucede con el impulso de los proyectos del Plan Integral Morelos, Corredor Interoceánico y el Tren Maya, símbolos de la colonización y exterminio contra los Pueblos que resisten al sistema capitalista. 

Además, se busca generar una política de asimilación e integración de los Pueblos Indígenas a través un nuevo indigenismo que tiene como elemento central el exterminio y sus pilares son la explotación, despojo, desprecio y represión.  El Estado mexicano ha banalizado también su derecho a decidir sobre su territorio.

Las políticas implementadas en materia social generan un asistencialismo y dependencia que impactan la visión colectiva y formas de organización de los Pueblos. En este sentido, reconocemos los aportes de los procesos que se han construido a partir de los Acuerdos de San Andrés junto al ejercicio pleno de la autonomía, autodeterminación y resistencia, como los son desde el 9 de agosto de 2003 el nacimiento de los Caracoles Zapatistas y las Junta de Buen Gobierno que impulsan el ejercicio de los derechos colectivos desde la organización de abajo, de los pueblos que avanzan en la liberación de la dependencia y control gubernamental.

Saludamos a los Pueblos Indígenas de México y el Mundo que, desde sus diferentes formas de Autonomía, Autodeterminación y Resistencia, persisten en la construcción de Paz y Vida Digna. Hoy como nunca son nuestra brújula para la defensa de los derechos humanos.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de Desinformémonos

Redacción Desinformémonos. (2022). Políticas del gobierno controlan, explotan y mercantilizan a los pueblos indígenas: Frayba. Desinformémonos. Recuperado el 09 de agosto de 2022, de https://desinformemonos.org/politicas-del-gobierno-controlan-explotan-y-mercantilizan-a-los-pueblos-indigenas-frayba/

Ante niveles peligrosos de contaminación, senadora de California llama a desaparecer la Junta Estatal del Agua

La senadora estatal Melissa Hurtado pidió desaparecer la Junta Estatal del Agua ante la lentitud para responder a las necesidades de las comunidades.

Univisión, con información de Paola Virrueta

06 de agosto de 2022

Una reciente auditoria ha alertado a algunos condados de California sobre niveles peligrosos e inseguros de contaminación del agua potable.

Ante ello, la senadora Melissa Hurtado está haciendo un llamado para eliminar, o al menos renovar, la Junta Estatal del Agua, pues asegura que es anticuada e incapaz de abordar una situación que califica como urgente.

En California, más de 900 mil personas corren el riesgo de contraer cáncer, problemas hepáticos y renales, ya que reciben agua potable de uno de los más de 370 sistemas que no cumplen con los estándares de calidad, según una auditoria presentada esta semana.

“La semana pasada el auditor estatal anunció en un nuevo reporte que el comité que controla el agua potable para las comunidades no está haciendo lo suficiente para dar agua potable saludable”, dijo Hurtado.

“Son casi un millón de personas que están en riesgo de tener cáncer, problemas renales y otros problemas de salud”, agregó.

Debido a esta situación, la senadora introdujo el proyecto de ley SB 1219 que busca disolver la Junta Estatal del Agua.

“Sigo en esta lucha para tratar de asegurar que los comités estatales hagan lo necesario para que las comunidades tengan los recursos que necesitan para sobrevivir”, señaló.

Hurtado señaló que las comunidades necesitan más infraestructura para servicios de agua, lo que requiere dinero y este trámite es complicado debido a la burocracia.

“Hay comunidades que yo represento que están durando de 3 hasta 15 años para tener agua potable saludable y todos tiene que ver con el proceso en el estado de California y el Comité de Agua”, señaló.

Hurtado dijo que ha enfrentado una posición fuerte en el Capitolio para que se apruebe su propuesta de disolver la Junta de Agua de California porque hay muchos intereses de por medio y porque hay quienes piensan que el estado actual del manejo del agua es el adecuado.

“Yo he escuchado en mis comunidades que necesitamos hacer cambios, pero los cambios que se necesitan son a nivel estatal”, señaló.

Hurtado dijo que al menos 20 departamentos tienen que ver los asuntos relacionados con el agua potable, por lo que hacer gestiones en este sentido es complicado.

Y añadió que para comunidad que no tiene con los recursos suficientes, emprender este recorrido burocrático es complicado.

La senadora indicó que las leyes que regulan el agua en California fueron escritas entre 1920 y 1940, cuando la población del estado era de 20 millones y actualmente hay 20 millones.

“Debemos tener un sistema que trabaje en el tiempo en el que estamos, representando a la cantidad de personas que viven en el estado”, indicó.

Al igual que la senadora Hurtado, el auditor estatal interino Michael Tilden criticó a los reguladores de la Junta Estatal del Agua por no otorgar la asistencia necesaria y urgente a los sistemas de agua que están presentando problemas.

Más de 150 de esos sistemas no han cumplido con los estándares de calidad durante por lo menos cinco años, y aproximadamente 430, que atienden a por lo menos 1 millón de personas, corren el riesgo de presentar complicaciones.

Por su parte, Joaquín Esquivel, presidente de la Junta Estatal del Agua, habló sobre los resultados de la auditoría sobre el estado del agua potable.

Dijo estar consciente de que deben mejorar los procesos y acortar el tiempo de atención en los condados con más problemas.

“Sabemos que tenemos mucho por hacer y también tenemos que poder quadruplicar el número de solicitudes ante la junta y casi duplicar las construcciones de infraestructura”, indicó.

Esquivel aseguró que han incrementado el número de personal técnico para ayudar a las comunidades en los últimos tres años.

Según el informe, más de dos tercios de los sistemas de agua que fallan están ubicados en comunidades de bajos ingresos, principalmente en ocho condados del Valle Central, el condado de San Bernardino y el condado de Imperial, lo que obliga a los residentes a comprar agua embotellada.

Según la ley estatal, todos los californianos tienen derecho a agua segura, limpia, asequible y accesible, algo que no se está cumpliendo en algunos condados.

Entre las recomendaciones de esta auditoria para la junta del agua, esta eliminar la burocracia y pasos innecesarios en los proceso de solicitud de servicios y acelerar los proyectos que se consideren especialmente urgentes.

Para conocer recursos y programas disponibles sobre el agua potable puedes visitar la página de California Water Boards.

Con información de Paola Virrueta.

“El presente artículo es propiedad de Univisión

Univisión. (2022). Ante niveles peligrosos de contaminación, senadora de California llama a desaparecer la Junta Estatal del Agua. Univisión. Recuperado el 06 de agosto de 2022, de https://www.univision.com/local/san-francisco-kdtv/politica-area-de-la-bahia/senadora-california-melissa-hurtado-llama-desaparecer-junta-estatal-agua